On the Blogs: Lack of Good Governance at the World Bank

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The process of selecting a new World Bank president has started. Pundits are already criticizing the process for being rushed, closed, and favoring the re-selection of the current President Jim Kim. This serves as a reminder of how political the international financial institutions are, although they often present themselves as being technical and apolitcal.

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What Did the Panama Papers Reveal About Africa (and the World)?

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A new report by Alvin Mosioma titled Panama Papers and the Looting of Africa provides insights into how complex corporate structures are used deliberately to hide away massive amounts of capital in tax havens. His findings depart from the popular discourse and approach to illicit financial flows, which has generally focused on how developing countries are poorly governed (the so-called anti-corruption consensus), rather than on systemic failure in the global financial architecture.

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Why Isn’t The World Bank’s Choice of Chief Economist More Controversial?

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This week it became clear that the World Bank has chosen Paul Romer as its next Chief Economist. As Chief Economist he’ll have the overall responsibility of the Bank’s research program and be able to shape the developments of the highly influential development institution. Commentators have named the choice of Chief Economist impressive, great, huge news, bold, and forward-thinking. The choice of World Bank Chief Economist rarely garners this much attention – so, why the fuss?

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Global Development Goals: If at All, Why, When and How?

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By Ingrid Harvold Kvangraven

Last week, the “Sustainable Development Goals” (SDGs) were launched at the UN in New York. This is the outcome of two years of consultations, lobbying, and debate about what the “post-2015” agenda should look like. The assumption has been that the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were a huge success and that we, therefore, must proceed with a new round. Unfortunately, this assumption is not backed by empirical evidence.

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How to Justify Teaching the Worst of Economics to Non-Economists

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By Ingrid Harvold Kvangraven

Being an Economics PhD student in a heterodox department gives me the privilege of taking courses in a range of different schools of thought within the discipline. In the Economics department, most of us take the stance that it is imperative to understand the mainstream in order to criticize them effectively. We go to great lengths to learn about the nuances of Neo-classical Economics, general equilibrium theory, and New-Keynesian Economics. Meanwhile, we also have full courses devoted to non-mainstream approaches, such as Post-Keynesian and Marxian Economics. We are aware of the ideological underpinnings of a lot of mainstream theory, and many of us see this as a motivation to challenge the discipline.

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